Business Education Standards - Orientation to Business (OTB)

 
The communication curriculum encourages mastery of the oral and written skills essential for interacting effectively with people in the workplace and in society. Of equal importance is the development of technology and processing skills critical for acquiring, interpreting, evaluating, and managing information.
 
While basic principles of communication remain fairly consistent, certain facets of it-such as international communication-are constantly evolving. As the world continues to change politically, economically, and geographically, new communication strategies will evolve. Educators must study and integrate these into the curriculum if students are to function effectively in a global society.
 
Technology, in particular, profoundly influences business communication, making technological competence a requirement for career advancement. Educators using these standards should also consult standards in international business and information technology to identify performance expectations that could be incorporated into their curriculum.
 
The body of knowledge called "communication" is unique in that it permeates all areas of the business education curriculum as well as all other educational disciplines. Communication standards, therefore, should not be limited to one course; they should be integrated throughout the curriculum.
 
Below is an overview of the achievement standards for the communication content area. Each achievement standard states the understanding and competency students should attain. Each achievement standard has corresponding performance expectations. Each performance expectation delineates what students need to do to exhibit the knowledge and the skills required to meet the achievement standard. The corresponding performance expectations for each achievement standard are detailed in the publication.
 
I. Foundations of Communication
Achievement Standard: Communicate in a clear, courteous, concise, and correct manner on personal and professional levels.
 
II. Social Communication
Achievement Standard: Apply basic social communication skills in personal and professional situations.
 
III. Technological Communication
Achievement Standard: Use technology to enhance the effectiveness of communication.
 
IV. Employment Communication
Achievement Standard: Integrate all forms of communication in the successful pursuit of employment.
 
V. Organizational Communication
Achievement Standard: Incorporate appropriate leadership and supervision techniques, customer service strategies, and personal ethics standards to communicate effectively with various business constituencies.
 
 
From the National Standards for Business Education © 2001 by the National Business Education Association, 1914 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191.
 

 
Business Education Standards
Career Development
 
CAREER DEVELOPMENT differs from other curriculum areas in that it encompasses an individual's total lifestyle-education, occupation, social responsibility, and leisure activities. Instead of being viewed as a course or unit of instruction studied at a specific time, career education is best integrated into the entire curriculum at all academic levels. When students begin career exploration at an early age, they gain a developmental understanding of their own strengths and weaknesses, the ever-evolving requirements of the workplace, and the relationship of lifelong learning to career success.
 
Learning to conduct a career search and to identify career pathways has become an important part of every student's education. Profound business and economic changes now underway in the United States and other industrialized countries are radically altering the workplace. Rather than charting a career path toward a single, long-term goal, individuals will explore multiple career paths and their interrelatedness. This will enable individuals to meet the needs of employers who are assembling workforces that are not only technically skilled and cross-trained but flexible and cost-effective. In this framework an individual who wants to enjoy a quality standard of living must be prepared to make wise career transitions and to continuously learn new skills.
Whether the methodology includes informational interviewing, Internet searches, mentoring, job shadowing, school-to-career initiatives, or cooperative education, these career development standards are appropriate for all students and all program areas and play an increasingly important role in the entire educational system.
 
Below is an overview of the achievement standards for the career develoment content area. Each achievement standard states the understanding and competency students should attain. Each achievement standard has corresponding performance expectations. Each performance expectation delineates what students need to do to exhibit the knowledge and the skills required to meet the achievement standard. The corresponding performance expectations for each achievement standard are detailed in the publication.
 
I. Self-Awareness
Achievement Standard: Assess personal skills, abilities, and aptitudes and personal strengths and weaknesses as they relate to career exploration and development.
 
II. Career Research
Achievement Standard: Utilize career resources to develop a career information database that includes international career opportunities.
 
III. Workplace Expectations
Achievement Standard: Relate the importance of workplace expectations to career development.
 
IV. Career Strategy
Achievement Standard: Apply knowledge gained from individual assessment to a comprehensive set of goals and an individual career plan.
 
V. School-to-Career Transition
Achievement Standard: Develop strategies to make an effective transition from school to career.
 
VI. Lifelong Learning
Achievement Standard: Relate the importance of lifelong learning to career success.
 
 
From the National Standards for Business Education © 2001 by the National Business Education Association, 1914 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191.